Modern conveniences have made life more pleasant, if not better, for many of us. But sometimes, modern conveniences may not be such a good thing in the long term. New options for purchasing alcohol may be one of those things.

These days, we don’t even have to travel anywhere to buy alcohol. It’s possible to buy alcohol from the comfort of our homes. We may buy alcohol online through Amazon.com or our local grocery stores. We may buy alcohol by using restaurant delivery services or contacting individual restaurants and bars.

Online alcohol sales are similar to alcohol sales in stores, restaurants, and bars. People who buy alcohol through these services must be twenty-one years old or older and show valid identification. People delivering the alcohol must also be twenty-one or older, although stores and restaurants do allow people to serve alcohol if they’re under that age.

All of this convenience may not be such a good thing. It makes alcohol very accessible. What if people are not able to travel to stores and restaurants because they have physical or mobility issues? Drinking alcohol may make such conditions worse.

In addition, what if people can’t drive to stores or restaurants to purchase alcohol because their driver’s licenses were suspended due to alcohol-related driving incidents? Sure, they’re not drinking under the influence, but they’re continuing to purchase alcohol, a substance that has created significant problems for them in the past. What if they’re addicted to alcohol but delivery options keep providing substances that continue to fuel their addiction?

Modern transportation conveniences are indeed a mixed blessing. We may call ride-sharing services to drive us places if we’ve been using alcohol or drugs. But some people may argue that such services may encourage people to use alcohol or drugs, or at least make people less likely to check their behavior.

It will be interesting to see whether alcohol delivery services and ride-sharing services do indeed change they way we purchase and consume alcohol.